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Lack of Preparation Contributes to Effects
When municipalities are unprepared, large storm events often overwhelm them with the need to clean up debris, conduct inspections, perform repairs, respond to questions, and verify substantial damage determination regulation requirements are met. Nothing can immunize a community from flooding, but implementing key practices before, during and after large storm events can minimize effects on your community and help prevent severe damage and repeat flooding. (Brief checklists for practices before, during and after a large storm...

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TagsTips, Storm Event, HMAP, GIS, Flooding,

Managing Urban Streams
Managing urban streams involves reducing floods and erosion and improving water quality. Flood and erosion control dominate most urban stream improvement projects, but often there are opportunities to simultaneously incorporate natural channel design features and improve water quality, urban habitat and aesthetics. The urban stream environment often prevents the design of a truly “natural” solution, but proper assessment of stream restoration activities can help reduce erosion and provide opportunities to improve a stream or creek’s natural...

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TagsTips, Stream Assessment, Fluvial Geomorphology, Erosion,

Project Overview
The City of Austin Watershed Protection Division (WPD) retained Freese and Nichols (FNI) to retrofit an existing Central Austin dry stormwater detention facility by integrating it with a new stormwater water quality wet pond. The WPD’s goal was to protect their community by reducing the impact of flooding, maintaining and improving water quality and creating a stable stream system to prevent erosion. FNI’s integration of a wet pond into the existing dry detention pond helped the WPD achieve these goals for stormwater runoff into Waller Creek.

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TagsWet Pond, Water Quality, Sustainability, Detention, Design,

What is the iSWM™ Program?
The North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) defines its Integrated Stormwater Management (iSWM™) Program for Construction and Development as “a cooperative initiative that assists cities and counties to achieve their goals of water quality protection, streambank protection, and flood control, while also helping communities meet their construction and post-construction obligations under state stormwater permits.”  The iSWM™ program was approved by NCTCOG in 2006 and details innovative...

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TagsStormwater Design, iSWM,

For more information, contact Lesley Brooks.

Sustainable Design Principles
Specifically related to stormwater, a sustainable project can be defined as a project that provides a balanced benefit to the community and the environment while being economically feasible in the present and future. A sustainable stormwater management project strives to provide recreational opportunity, habitat creation/preservation, flood control, water quality improvement, and long term maintenance plans with adequate funding and staffing...

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TagsSustainability, Stormwater Design, Resources, Projects,

What is a SSWAP?
A SSWAP applies sustainability to stormwater management practices for development and redevelopment to improve the water quality of waterways within a community. A SSWAP offers substantial benefits to the community and environment through reducing maintenance burdens, addressing flooding and erosion problems through best management practices, and protecting and restoring watershed health.

Getting the Ball Rolling in your Community
Stormwater management is a critical piece of the puzzle for a community to become truly...

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TagsSustainability, SSWAP,

Data Model
The Arc Hydro data model was developed to transition hydrologic modeling from an inventory-based data model to a behavioral model, established on the relationship between various hydrologic data sets. Arc Hydro has been adopted as the water resources industry standard geodatabase structure or “schema” and is comprised of five major data types: drainage features, geometric flow network, hydrography, channel description and time series. The relationships between the layers are determined by tracing the flow path of water through any given region. One benefit...

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TagsTools, Resources, GIS,

How Does It Work?
Generally, a 1-D hydraulic engine is used to model flow through storm sewers or channels, and the 2-D hydraulic engine is used to model the overland flow that occurs when the drainage system capacity is exceeded. However, the results from a 2-D model are only as good as the data used to build the surface model. So, the first requirement for 2-D modeling is an accurate surface model that represents the ground surface. If possible, the surface model should be built with breaklines that represent physical features such as curbs, walls, or changes in...

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TagsHydraulic Modeling, 2-D Modeling,

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