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The staff at Fort Hood take great pride in providing an environment to train U.S. troops to protect our country and our interests around the world. While serving this important mission, Fort Hood is required to comply with Clean Water Act requirements to protect water quality from pollution in urban storm water runoff. Like many cities throughout Texas and the U.S., Fort Hood is an operator of a Phase II Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System...

Read More - Fort Hood Storm System Mapping: Turning Compliance into Productivity

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TagsSystem Mapping, Phase II MS4,

Project Background

When the 23 dams in the Upper Brushy Creek watershed in southern Williamson County were built by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service in the 1960s, they met all safety standards for earthen dams in sparsely populated areas. Now, 21 of those dams provide flood control for one of central Texas’ fastest growing populations and, due to increased potential risk to the public (risk creep), are classified as high hazard dams....

Read More - Promoting Safety and Awareness in Williamson County Through a Flood Monitoring System (FMS)

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TagsFlood Monitoring,

Small cities, counties and other regulated entities are now in the third year of their first five-year permit to implement their Phase II MS4 program to protect water quality from pollutants in stormwater runoff. Year-to-year progress towards implementation must be demonstrated to the TCEQ until the full program is in place by August 2012. Some of the challenges and potential solutions faced by those implementing Phase II MS4 programs are discussed below.

Interdepartmental...

Read More - Key Challenges of Implementing Phase II MS4

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TagsStormwater Utility, Phase II MS4, Ordinance, iSWM,

Lack of Preparation Contributes to Effects When municipalities are unprepared, large storm events often overwhelm them with the need to clean up debris, conduct inspections, perform repairs, respond to questions, and verify substantial damage determination regulation requirements are met. Nothing can immunize a community from flooding, but implementing key practices before, during and after large storm events can minimize effects on your community and help prevent severe damage and repeat flooding. (Brief checklists...

Read More - Fighting the Floods: Tips for Minimizing the Effects of Large Storm Events on Your Community

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TagsTips, Storm Event, HMAP, GIS, Flooding,

Managing Urban Streams Managing urban streams involves reducing floods and erosion and improving water quality. Flood and erosion control dominate most urban stream improvement projects, but often there are opportunities to simultaneously incorporate natural channel design features and improve water quality, urban habitat and aesthetics. The urban stream environment often prevents the design of a truly “natural” solution, but proper assessment of stream restoration activities can help reduce erosion and provide opportunities to...

Read More - Using Stream Assessments to Incorporate Natural Channel Design and Minimize Erosion

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TagsTips, Stream Assessment, Fluvial Geomorphology, Erosion,

Project Overview The City of Austin Watershed Protection Division (WPD) retained Freese and Nichols (FNI) to retrofit an existing Central Austin dry stormwater detention facility by integrating it with a new stormwater water quality wet pond. The WPD’s goal was to protect their community by reducing the impact of flooding, maintaining and improving water quality and creating a stable stream system to prevent erosion. FNI’s integration of a wet pond into the existing...

Read More - Integrating Water Quality With Water Quantity: City of Austin's Waller Creek Water Quality Retrofit Project

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TagsWet Pond, Water Quality, Sustainability, Detention, Design,

What is the iSWM™ Program? The North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) defines its Integrated Stormwater Management (iSWM™) Program for Construction and Development as “a cooperative initiative that assists cities and counties to achieve their goals of water quality protection, streambank protection, and flood control, while also helping communities meet their construction and post-construction obligations under state stormwater permits.” The iSWM™ program was approved by NCTCOG in 2006 and details...

Read More - Going "iSWMing" in North Texas: What You Need to Know about NCTCOG's iSWM Program

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TagsStormwater Design, iSWM,

For more information, contact Lesley Brooks .

Sustainable Design Principles Specifically related to stormwater, a sustainable project can be defined as a project that provides a balanced benefit to the community and the environment while being economically feasible in the present and future. A sustainable stormwater management project strives to provide recreational opportunity, habitat creation/preservation, flood control, water quality improvement, and long term maintenance plans with adequate funding and staffing....

Read More - Applying Sustainable Principles to Stormwater Design

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TagsSustainability, Stormwater Design, Resources, Projects,

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