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Our Involvement at World Environmental Congress

Freese and Nichols attended the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, May 17-21 in Austin, Texas. We partnered with the American Society of Civil Engineers' Environmental & Water Resources Institute (EWRI) as a sponsor and booth exhibitor.

Les Boyd, Water Resources Design, Austin, presented An Owner’s Journey at the Congress on Dam Safety in Texas on Tuesday, May 19, focused on the Lower Colorado River Authority's management of the Highland Lake dams beginning in the 1930s.

The City of Austin presented Tiny Dams – What are they and how should they be regulated? on Wednesday, May 20. Freese and Nichols has worked with the City since 2003 to develop its award-winning Stormwater Pond Safety Program, an ongoing program which assesses dam-related risks for stormwater ponds throughout the city, prioritizes high-hazard dams for mitigation, and provides dam safety requirements and emergency engineering evaluation service.

Kim Patak, Stormwater, Austin, and Coby Gee, Treatment Transmission & Utilities, Austin, served on the local arrangemen​ts committee to organize the social and technical tours.​ 

Kim helped organize and attended a technical tour, Innovative Stormwater Treatment and Stream Restoration projects on Sunday, May 17. The tour guided guests through 10 of Austin's stormwater management projects, green infrastructure, and stream restoration projects.

Coby organized a group run and Kim also participated in a bicycle ride around Lady Bird Lake, where the Colorado River passes through Austin. Attendees rode across the Longhorn Dam, the lake's new Boardwalk, and the outfall for the Waller Creek Tunnel.

 

Kim serve as Chair-Elect and Will Huff serves as Communications Chair in EWRI's Austin Branch. View more photos from the conference on our Facebook page.

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Tagsstormwater management, stream restoration, World Environmental Water Resources Congress, ASCE, Environmental Water Resources Institute,

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