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Tom Hill Joins Southeast Treatment, Transmission and Utilities Group

Tom HillWe are pleased to announce that Tom Hill, P.E., has joined our Southeast Treatment, Transmission and Utilities Group. He will serve as a senior engineer with the Pearland office to support our water transmission subpractice team.

Tom brings more than 35 years of expertise in hydraulic analysis of fluid piping systems associated with the oil and gas industry, municipal water industry, power plants and refineries. He specializes in surge modeling, which helps to predict, identify and demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed solutions as they relate to pipelines.

“Tom’s depth of knowledge in hydraulics is a tremendous asset for the entire Freese and Nichols team,” said Bob Pence, CEO of Freese and Nichols. “His expertise in surge modeling allows us to expand the capabilities offered directly from our Pearland office, positioning us to efficiently serve municipal, water district, and oil and gas clients.”

Prior to joining Freese and Nichols, Tom served as a lead flow assurance and hydraulic engineer at Amec Foster Wheeler. In this role, Tom was charged with providing hydraulic consulting services for in-house engineering projects, as well as consulting services for outside companies in need of technical support for flow assurance and hydraulics for pipelines and piping systems. Tom also served as a lead pipeline engineer and senior mechanical engineer for GL Industrial Services USA and Gulf Interstate Engineering Company, respectively. In these roles, he developed offline simulation models, hydraulic transient analyses and flow studies related to the efficiency of pipeline projects for clients representing various industries.

In addition to his role at Freese and Nichols, Tom serves as an instructor for the Petroleum Extension Service of the University of Texas. He previously conducted seminars for the Gas Certification Institute that were attended by participants from across the nation.

Tom received a bachelor’s degree in nuclear engineering from the University of Arizona. 

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