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Changes in the annual growth rings of exposed tree roots after exposure to the elements allow us to utilize exposed tree roots that are available on project sites for erosion rate assessment.

This method, known as dendrogeomorphology, has been predominantly used in Europe for land slide and hill-slope erosion assessment. But over the past 10 years, Bryan Dick and Ian Jewel have developed its use for assessing river and streambank erosion across the...

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Tagsroot dendrogeomorphology, Erosion, stream, streambank,

In the fight against erosion, articulated concrete blocks serve as an option to armor auxiliary spillways.

A new chapter in the National Engineering Handbook – reviewed by Freese and Nichols’ Grady Hillhouse, PE, and Colin Young, PE – covers articulated concrete blocks (ACBs), its usages, new design methodologies, design considerations, maintenance and installation guidance.

Grady and Colin worked in collaboration with the Natural Resources Conservation Service ’s National Design, Construction and Soil Mechanics...

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Tagsdam, dam safety, ncrs, national resources conservation service, spillway, Erosion,

Freese and Nichols' Kim Patak will present “When Rivers and Infrastructure Collide,” Jan. 23 at the Texas Regional Stormwater Conference in New Braunfels.

Millions of dollars are spent each year repairing America’s infrastructure due to damage from stream erosion. Concepts of fluvial geomorphology, planning and holistic engineering are integrated into the resiliency approach to prevent, protect, respond and recover from problems caused by stream erosion.

This presentation uses real-world examples to outline...

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Tagsresiliency, Flooding, stream erosion, Erosion, Infrastructure,

Just as trees’ inner rings tell the story of their growth, their roots can reveal how quickly the earth is washing away around them. It’s critical information for addressing watershed problems.

Freese and Nichols’ Bryan Dick, left, and Ian Jewell, right, not only adapted a method for reading exposed tree roots to measure rates of riverbank erosion, but our team is using the technique for a growing list of clients.

Since...

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Tagsroot dendrogeomorphology, Dendrogeomorphology, Oklahoma, Erosion, streambank, pollution,

Just as trees’ inner rings tell the story of their growth, their roots can reveal how quickly the earth is washing away around them. It’s critical information for addressing watershed problems.

Freese and Nichols’ Bryan Dick, left, and Ian Jewell, right, not only adapted a method for reading exposed tree roots to measure rates of riverbank erosion, but our team is using the technique for a growing list of clients.

Since...

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Tagsroot dendrogeomorphology, Dendrogeomorphology, Oklahoma, Erosion, streambank, pollution,

Note: This is the first article in a series on dendrogeomorphology.

The rate at which streambanks are eroding, and the total annual quantity of sediment being entrained from those eroding streambanks are of a primary concern for ecological, water quality and sediment studies.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently determined that streambank erosion constitutes as high as 90 percent of the annual sediment yield found in rivers.

With strong regulatory pressure...

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TagsDendrogeomorphology, Erosion, root, streambank,

Managing Urban Streams Managing urban streams involves reducing floods and erosion and improving water quality. Flood and erosion control dominate most urban stream improvement projects, but often there are opportunities to simultaneously incorporate natural channel design features and improve water quality, urban habitat and aesthetics. The urban stream environment often prevents the design of a truly “natural” solution, but proper assessment of stream restoration activities can help reduce erosion and provide opportunities to improve...

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TagsTips, Stream Assessment, Fluvial Geomorphology, Erosion,