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Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions changed marginally across the United States this week. The Drought Severity and Coverage Index (DSCI) remained at 39, as the percent coverage of D0-D3 conditions each changed by less than one percent. Over this past week, light to moderate precipitation fell from east Texas up through New England, while heavier precipitation, occurred from southwest Louisiana to the southern Appalachian Mountains. Heavy precipitation in the form of snowfall occurred in mountainous areas of the Pacific Northwest and in the central and northern Rocky Mountains, causing dryness and drought improvements. Conversely, areas that received minimal precipitation, such as parts west of the Rocky Mountains, experienced increases in drought coverage. Furthermore, high evaporative demands caused dryness and drought conditions to increase and expand across central and southern Texas.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Mixed conditions continued across Texas this past week. Moderate to heavy precipitation fell in southeast Texas, removing some abnormal dryness (D0). Similarly, short-term precipitation deficits diminished and moderate drought (D1) disappeared entirely in the northwest Texas Panhandle. In contrast, minimal precipitation occurred from northeast Texas to the central and south-central Texas and the Edwards Plateau, causing drought conditions to expand and intensify. Overall, the percent area of D0-D3 conditions each increased across the state.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

D1 and D2 drought conditions persisted in the western Oklahoma Panhandle, as well as in the Red River Valley in southwest Oklahoma.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Moderate to heavy precipitation fell in southeast Louisiana, while heavy rainfall (2 to 6 inches) occurred from southwest Louisiana eastward to central Mississippi. As a result, the percent area of D0 conditions constricted by nearly 17 percent across Louisiana, particularly in central portions of the state. D1 conditions were removed entirely in northwest Louisiana.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Moderate to large snowpack in higher elevation areas of northern New Mexico led to decreases in severe drought (D2) coverage. Conversely, lower elevation areas of northern New Mexico continued to experience D1 and D2 conditions. D0 conditions also slightly expanded in eastern New Mexico.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Over this past week, moderate to heavy precipitation occurred across the Southeast, with exceptions of the southern Florida Peninsula and coastal portions of the Carolinas. Overall, Georgia experienced no changes in dryness or drought coverage this week. Areas of southwest Georgia continued to experience D0 conditions.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Rainfall caused improvements in dryness and drought conditions across Florida this week. D1 conditions dissipated in southern Florida and some pockets of D0 conditions were removed in south-central Florida. Meanwhile, coverage of D0 conditions slightly decreased in the eastern portion of the Florida Panhandle.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

The percent coverage of dryness and drought conditions in North Carolina remained the same as last week.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over the next week, the largest precipitation accumulations in the U.S. are projected to occur in the Pacific Northwest, northern Rocky Mountains, and from the lower Great Plains and Southeast up to the Great Lakes.  Little to no rainfall is projected to occur across large areas of southern California and Nevada, the Southwest, and West Texas. To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

 

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

 

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

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TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

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