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Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions slightly expanded across multiple regions of the United States this week. The nationwide Drought Severity and Coverage Index (DSCI) grew from 82 to 84, as the total percent coverage of abnormally dry (D0), moderate (D1), severe (D2) and extreme (D3) drought conditions all expanded. In addition, exceptional drought (D4) conditions developed in southeastern Colorado and southwestern Kansas. Over this past week, little to no precipitation occurred across regions of the West, Southwest and Great Plains, which caused dryness and drought conditions to largely persist or expand. Moderate rainfall (2-3 inches) across areas of the Northeast, Midwest, South, Southeast, High Plains and northern Rockies led to some reductions of D0 and D1; however, D0 and D1 sustained or increased in portions of these areas where rainfall was lighter (less than 1 inch).

 (The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

In Texas, dryness and drought conditions continued to develop and intensify. The statewide coverage of D0, D1, D2 and D3 each expanded this week, causing the DSCI across Texas to increase from 88 to 98. The Texas Panhandle and West Texas have been particularly impacted by dryness and drought conditions due to minimal rainfall accumulation (less than 1 inch) in many areas over the last 30 days. Areas in central and southeast Texas also experienced further development of D0 and D1 due to a lack of rainfall this week.

 

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Similarly, dryness and drought conditions continued to develop and intensify across western and northern Oklahoma due primarily to accumulated rainfall deficits in the last 30 days. Over the past week, the Oklahoma statewide coverage of D0, D1, D2 and D3 conditions all expanded, as warm temperatures, low humidity and minimal rainfall further aggravated conditions.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Light to moderate rain fell across Louisiana this week. As a result, nearly the entire state remained free of any dryness or drought conditions, with the exception of small areas impacted by D0 conditions along the Texas/Louisiana border (Vernon and Beauregard Parishes) and Louisiana/Mississippi border (Tensas Parish).

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Most of eastern and northern New Mexico continued to be impacted by D0-D3 conditions due to continued rainfall deficits. Over the past 90 days, nearly all of New Mexico has received below normal rainfall, with some areas of eastern New Mexico receiving less than 10 percent of normal.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

In the Southeast, regionwide rainfall mostly inhibited the development of any dryness or drought conditions over this past week. One notable exception was in southwest Georgia, where D0 conditions developed due to below normal precipitation and stream flows over the last 30 days, as well as declining soil moisture.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Most of Florida remained free of any dryness or drought conditions, with the exception of some persisting D0 conditions in the far western portion of the Florida Panhandle. However, many areas along the Florida Gulf Coast have experienced 2 to 4 inches of rainfall deficits over the past two weeks, which may cause some dryness or drought conditions to develop over the next few weeks.

 (The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Similar to most of the Southeast region, North Carolina is not currently experiencing any dryness or drought conditions.

 

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over the next week, the greatest precipitation accumulations in the United States are projected to occur across the northern High Plains and Southeast. Little to no rainfall is projected across most of the West and Midwest, as well as central and south Texas. To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

 

 

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

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TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

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