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Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions slightly improved across the United States this week. The total percent area of D0 (abnormal dryness), D1 (moderate drought), D2 (severe drought) and D3 (extreme drought) all constricted. Over this past week, winter storms impacted multiple regions across the U.S., generating heavy snow in mountainous areas of the west, upper Plains, upper Midwest and the Northeast. Moderate to heavy rainfall occurred in the Southwest, alleviating some dryness and drought conditions across the region. Similarly, rainfall caused lingering dryness to further dissipate in areas of the southern Ohio River Valley, Mid-Atlantic and Southeast. Conversely, relatively minimal precipitation occurred in the Northwest and Gulf Coast states, inhibiting any notable changes in dryness.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Texas experienced a mix of conditions over this past week. Rainfall occurred in areas of central Texas, causing some abnormal dryness (D0) and moderate drought (D1) conditions to decrease. In contrast, D0 and D1 conditions continued to expand in northeast Texas, while extreme drought (D3) conditions developed in Llano and Burnet Counties.  

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Oklahoma experienced increases in dryness and drought conditions, particularly in northwestern Oklahoma. The percent area of D0 and D1 conditions expanded by nearly 11 and 2 percent, respectively. These dry conditions, combined with high winds, caused wildfires to outbreak in western areas of the state.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Similarly, D0 and D1 conditions further expanded in areas of Louisiana. In particular, the percent area of D0 conditions increased by over 16 percent across the state.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

In the Southwest, two storms occurred over this past week, bringing record-breaking precipitation. As a result, the percent area of D0 and D1 conditions decreased by over 25 and 13 percent across New Mexico, respectively. D2 coverage also slightly constricted in New Mexico.  These heavy precipitation totals helped improve some drought effects that have persisted in the area, such as dry soil moisture, precipitation-deficits and low streamflows.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Rainfall continued to reduce dryness and drought conditions many areas of the Southeast. In Georgia, the percent area of D0, D1 and D2 conditions all constricted across the state. However, two pockets of D2 conditions in northern Georgia continue to see minimal drought improvements due to precipitation-deficits and low streamflows.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Rainfall totals continue to remain below normal in Florida, which caused abnormal dryness (D0) and moderate drought (D1) conditions to expand. D1 conditions developed in southern Florida counties, including Miami-Dade, Monroe, Broward, Collier and Palm Beach Counties.

 (The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

In contrast, rainfall removed all abnormal dryness conditions across North Carolina, marking the first time since early May of this year that the state has not experienced any dryness or drought conditions.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over the next week, the largest precipitation accumulations in the U.S. are projected to occur across the Pacific Northwest, Gulf Coast, and states along the East Coast.  Little to no rainfall is projected to occur in areas across the Southwest and lower Great Plains. To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

 

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

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TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

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