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Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions largely persisted across multiple regions of the United States this week. Overall, the nationwide Drought Severity and Coverage Index (DSCI) decreased from 161 to 157, as the total percent coverage of abnormally dry (D0), moderate (D1), severe (D2), and extreme (D3) drought conditions slightly declined on U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM) scale. Last week, Hurricane Zeta made landfall and brought moderate rainfall (2 to 4 inches) along its path, with locally heavier amounts (up to 8 inches) in Mississippi and Alabama. Additionally, precipitation (1.5 to 3.5 inches, up to 5 locally) occurred from the south-central Great Plains eastward into the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys. Light snow also accumulated in parts of western New England and upstate New York. In contrast, little or no precipitation occurred in areas of the West, Southwest, Rockies, Great Plains, and upper Midwest. Above normal temperatures, coupled with minimal precipitation, led to minimal drought improvement across the western half of the U.S.

 (The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over this past week, moderate to heavy precipitation (1.5 to 5 inches) occurred across the south-central Great Plains, which led to improvements in drought conditions in the Texas Panhandle. However, little to no precipitation fell in areas of West Texas and the southern half of Texas, resulting in either persistence or degradation of drought conditions. South-central Texas also experienced below normal precipitation, which caused further development of D0 and D1 conditions.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Moderate to heavy precipitation across the south-central Plains caused significant improvement in dryness and drought conditions throughout Oklahoma. Overall, the statewide coverage of D0, D1, D2, and D3 conditions decreased by approximately 26, 22, 10, and 2 percent, respectively.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Precipitation from Hurricane Zeta led to some removal of D0 conditions in southeastern Louisiana.

 (The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Meanwhile, warm, and dry conditions continued in the Southwest. Consequently, New Mexico experienced minimal improvements in any dryness or drought conditions.  

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

In the Southeast, Hurricane Zeta brought moderate to heavy rainfall across multiple parts of the region. Additionally, some light to moderate (1 to 2.5 inches) rain fell across portions of Florida and southern Georgia. As a result, D0 conditions slightly dissipated in southeastern Georgia.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Mostly wet conditions continued across Florida. Accordingly, the state continued to remain free of any abnormally dry or drought conditions on the USDM scale.

 (The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Continuing the trend over the last few months, North Carolina remained free of any abnormally dry or drought conditions on the USDM scale.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over the next week, the greatest precipitation accumulations in the contiguous United States are projected in areas in the Pacific Northwest, as well as the Southeast and Gulf of Mexico as Tropical Storm Eta travels inland. Meanwhile, little to no rainfall is projected throughout portions of the Southwest and Upper Great Plains. To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

 

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

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TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

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