You are here

Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions decreased throughout the United States over this past week.  The percent area of D0 (abnormally dry), D1 (moderate drought), D2 (severe drought), and D3 (extreme drought) all contracted, and DSCI (drought severity and coverage index) declined from 72 to 68, marking the first time since mid-July that DSCI decreased in the U.S.  During the middle of last week, Tropical Storm Nestor and its remnants moved across the Southeast and up through the East Coast. The combination of this storm, as well as a front later on in the week, induced several inches of rainfall across areas of east Texas and from the Mississippi River to the East Coast. Similarly, several Pacific frontal systems caused precipitation to occur in the Pacific Northwest. Abnormal dryness and drought conditions subsequently decreased across areas of the Pacific Northwest, southern Plains, Southeast, Ohio Valley, Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. Conversely, a lack of rainfall caused abnormal dryness and drought conditions to either persist or expand in the Southwest and portions of the southern and central Plains.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over this past week, abnormal dryness and drought conditions persisted or expanded in parts of central Texas, while they decreased in eastern Texas. Overall, the percent area of D0, D1, D2, and D3 slightly decreased across the state.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

The percent area of D0 and D1 conditions increased across Oklahoma by nearly 15 and 2 percent, respectively, particularly in southwestern Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Panhandle.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Rainfall alleviated abnormal dryness and drought conditions in parts of Louisiana. The percent area of D0 and D1 decreased by approximately 7 and 3, respectively.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Abnormal dryness and drought conditions expanded and intensified across northern and western New Mexico.  The percent area of D0 and D1 increased by over 6 and 16 percent, respectively, while D2 slightly increased.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Heavy rainfall, primarily due to Tropical Storm Nestor, caused decreases in abnormal dryness and drought conditions across large areas of the Southeast. In Georgia, severe and extreme drought conditions diminished, as the percent area of D1, D2 and D3 decreased across the state by approximately 9, 49 and 11 percent, respectively. Even though drought conditions have become less severe in Georgia, 100 percent of the state still remains in D0 status and nearly 89 percent in D1 status. In Gordon County, reports have shown that these persisting drought conditions have caused lingering impacts, including dry ponds and creeks, dead pastures, dying trees and dying cattle.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Rainfall caused abnormal dryness and drought conditions to decrease in North Carolina, particularly in the eastern and central portions of the state. The percent area of D0, D1 and D2 decreased by nearly 14, 23 and 4 percent, respectively.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over the next week, precipitation is projected to occur throughout most of the eastern half of the U.S., particularly across the lower Appalachian Mountains. Little to no rainfall is projected to occur across the West, Southwest, the Dakotas, and Minnesota. To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

 

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

Subscribe to our Blogs

TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

Comments

I have a project in school on environmental issues and I used this and my teacher loved it! I have to do a reflection on what I could do to help, so this is perfect!