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Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions continued to increase across the United States. Over this past week, DSCI (drought severity and coverage index) increased from 41 to 48 – the highest it has been since mid-February of this year. The percent area of D0 (abnormally dry), D1 (moderate drought), D2 (severe drought), and extreme drought (D3) expanded across the U.S. A weakened Hurricane Dorian tracked northeastward along the Atlantic Coast, inducing rainfall that accumulated in some coastal locations, particularly the Carolinas and Maine. The Upper Great Plains and western and northern Midwest experienced widespread rainfall as several frontal systems drove out of Canada. In contrast, little to no rainfall occurred in areas of the lower Great Plains (eastern Oklahoma and bordering states), southern and eastern portions of the Midwest (most of Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky), and West (coast of California, central and southern Nevada).

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Dry and warm weather was prevalent across most of the South, triggering drought conditions to intensify throughout most of Texas, with some exceptions. Over this past week, little to no rainfall occurred in northern and central Texas, causing increases in D0, D1, D2 and D3 conditions across these areas. In contrast, drought conditions slightly improved in areas of southern Texas due to some rainfall (1 to 3 inches); conditions also slightly improved around the Midland area and Trans Pecos region. Over the past 30 days, accumulated precipitation totals have been below normal for the majority of the state, which has contributed to these enhanced drought conditions.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Similarly, drought conditions persisted and intensified throughout most of Oklahoma. The total percent area of D0, D1, D2 and D3 increased over this past week, most notably in the southeastern part of the state.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Drought conditions also intensified in northern Louisiana, where the percent area of D0 and D1 increased by approximately 6 and 4 percent, respectively. Topsoil moisture in Louisiana has been particularly impacted by these conditions. According to the USDA, 60 percent of topsoil moisture is considered to be dry, which is well above 5- and 10-year averages in Louisiana. 

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

In the Southwest U.S., above normal temperatures and dry weather continued. The summer monsoon only produced light showers across central New Mexico. As a result, the percent area of D0, D1 and D2 all increased, particularly in the western (bordering Arizona) and southeast portions of the state.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Minimal to no rainfall, with the exception of a few pockets, occurred across southern and northeastern Georgia. Consequently, drought conditions increased and USGS 7-day streams flows declined, with multiple sites across the state recording flows in the lower 10th percentile (much below normal). The percent area of D0 and D1 conditions amplified, while D2 conditions developed in areas around Atlanta, as well as Burke and Screven Counties on the Georgia coast.

 

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Rainfall from Hurricane Dorian accumulated along the coasts of the Carolinas, causing D0 to decrease and D1 to cease in southeastern North Carolina. In contrast, rainfall rapidly declined inland, causing D0 conditions to develop in multiple areas of western North Carolina.  

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

The greatest precipitation accumulations in the U.S. are forecasted to occur in and around Florida, as tropical systems move west across the Atlantic Ocean. According to the National Hurricane Center, the tropical system that is closest to Florida has a 70% chance of forming into at least a tropical depression. Little to no rainfall is projected to occur across multiple states in the West (southern California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming) and Great Plains (western Nebraska and Kansas, central Texas). To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

 

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

 

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

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TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

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