You are here

Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions slightly contracted across the United States this week. The nationwide Drought Severity and Coverage Index (DSCI) decreased from 41 to 40, as the percent coverage of D1-D3 conditions constricted, while D0 conditions slightly expanded. Over this past week, storms brought precipitation to areas of the West, central Great Plains, southeastern Plains and into the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys. Rainfall overlapped areas previously impacted by drought, including California and southern Texas, which reduced some dryness and drought conditions. Conversely, dry and warm conditions occurred across many areas of the lower Southeast, particularly Florida, where weekly temperatures averaged over 10°F above normal and weekly accumulated precipitation was 10 percent (or less) of normal. These dry conditions induced the expansion or intensification of abnormal dryness (D0), moderate (D1) and severe (D2) drought conditions in these areas.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Rainfall occurred across areas of southern, central and northeastern Texas over this past week. In southern Texas, this rainfall led to a reduction in coverage of D0-D3 conditions in most areas. However, a small patch of exceptional drought (D4) continued along and near the Rio Grande in Zapata County.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

In Oklahoma, drought conditions persisted across the Panhandle, while abnormal dryness (D0) and moderate drought (D1) conditions slightly constricted in southwestern areas.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Precipitation totals remained below normal in southern Louisiana, particularly along the Gulf Coast. As a result, D0 conditions slightly expanded and D1 conditions persisted.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Minimal rainfall occurred across New Mexico over this past week. Consequently, dryness and drought conditions persisted over most of the northern half of New Mexico. Overall, the percent coverage of D0-D2 conditions remained the same as last week.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Over this past week, contrasting conditions occurred in northern and southern portions of the Southeast. Northern areas  of the Southeast were wet, with many areas receiving 2 to 4 inches of rainfall. Conversely, below normal precipitation instigated dryness and drought conditions along the Gulf Coast and in Florida. These dryness impacts expanded into southern Georgia from Florida, as abnormal dryness (D0) conditions developed in Georgia for the first time in over three weeks.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

During the first three weeks of March, no measurable rainfall occurred in many areas of Florida, including Tampa, Lakeland and Sarasota-Bradenton, while areas of Orlando, Fort Myers and Daytona Beach only recorded 0.02 of an inch. Consequently, dryness and drought conditions continued to expand and intensify across the state this week. The statewide coverage of D0 conditions reached nearly 90 percent, D1 conditions developed in Collier and Hendry Counties, and D1-D2 conditions persisted in the Big Bend region.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Continuing the trend of over past month, North Carolina continues to remain free of any dryness or drought conditions.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over the next week, the largest precipitation accumulations in the United States are projected to occur across areas of the Pacific Northwest, Intermountain West, far western Midwest, and South regions. Little to no rainfall is projected in the Southwest, as well as large portions of southern California, Nevada, Indiana, Ohio, Delaware and New Jersey. To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

 

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

 

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

Subscribe to our Blogs

TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

Comments

I have a project in school on environmental issues and I used this and my teacher loved it! I have to do a reflection on what I could do to help, so this is perfect!