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Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions decreased overall in the United States. DSCI (drought severity and coverage index) decreased from 15 to 13, and the percent area of D0 (abnormally dry), D1 (moderate drought), and D2 (severe drought) conditions decreased. On July 13, Hurricane Barry made landfall in southern Louisiana, delivering heavy rainfall locally and a large storm surge. However, Barry largely spared crops and communities in its path and erased drought conditions across Louisiana. As Barry traveled further inland, it dissipated and was ultimately downgraded to a tropical depression. Throughout the rest of the country, record rainfall totals were recorded in local areas across the northern half of the Plains and upper Midwest, reducing drought conditions. Areas impacted by the remnants of Barry, such as the mid-South, remained relatively cool and wet. In contrast, many other areas of the country experienced dry, warm temperatures, including expansive areas in the West and portions of the southern Plains and Midwest. This mid-July heat contributed to a growing concern of soil dryness across the lower Midwest.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Hot, dry weather encompassed most of southern Texas, which led to an expansion of abnormal dryness (D0) and moderate to severe drought conditions (D1 and D2). Brownsville, Texas, located on the southern tip of the state, recorded daily-record highs in temperature of 100 degrees and 102 degrees on July 11 and July 13, respectively. Similarly, Corpus Christi, located on the Gulf of Mexico, experienced three consecutive daily-record highs in temperature of 101, 101 and 103 degrees from July 11-13.

 Southwest Oklahoma experienced a slight increase in abnormally dry conditions. However, more than 99% of the state remains free of drought conditions.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Hurricane Barry expunged abnormally dry conditions from Louisiana.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Small areas of severe drought (D2) expanded into Clay County and Early County in southwestern Georgia. Abnormally dry and moderate drought coverage reduced in pockets of southeastern Georgia, but continued to persist throughout most of the state.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Drought conditions slightly improved overall in North Carolina, however, abnormally dry and moderate drought conditions continued to persist across the southeastern portion of the state.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

The greatest precipitation accumulations in the U.S. are expected to be concentrated on the Coastal Plains, specifically in southern Alabama, the Great Smoky Mountains, and the North Carolina coast. To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

 

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

 

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

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TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

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