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Current Drought Conditions in the United States

Drought conditions continued across multiple regions of the United States this week. The nationwide Drought Severity and Coverage Index (DSCI) remained at 133, as the total percent coverage of abnormal dryness (D0), moderate (D1), severe (D2), extreme (D3), and severe (D4) drought conditions changed by less than 1 percent on U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM) scale. Over this past week, dozens of dangerous wildfires continued to burn across the western U.S., with the greatest concentration occurring in the Pacific Coast states. In conjunction with these wildfires, summer-like temperatures and moderate- to extreme-drought conditions persisted across large portions of these same western states. Meanwhile, Hurricane Sally dumped historic and catastrophic amounts  of rainfall in areas of southern Alabama and western Florida and brought high winds along and near the Gulf Coast that caused extensive damage. As Sally traveled inland, it weakened rapidly, but still continued to bring heavy rainfall and flash flooding to impacted areas  Elsewhere, periods of heavy precipitation and record-setting low temperatures occurred across portions of the Rockies, Great Plains, and upper Midwest, leading to drought-improvement in some rangeland and pastures.

 (The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

In Texas, heavy rainfall occurred across parts of the North Central Plains and West Texas over this past week, leading to reductions in coverage of D0, D1, D2, and D3 conditions. However, D4 conditions largely persisted across portions of Brewster and Presidio Counties.

 

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Some of this rainfall extended from Texas northward into Oklahoma, causing slight reductions in coverage of D0-D3 across portions of western Oklahoma.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Meanwhile, patches of abnormally dry conditions appeared in multiple counties across Louisiana.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Parts of eastern New Mexico received much-needed precipitation; however, this led to minimal drought improvements. Overall, nearly the entire state continues to be impacted by moderate (D1) to extreme (D3) drought conditions.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)  

Patches of abnormal dryness (D0) persisted across multiple states in the Southeast, even as Hurricane Sally dropped heavy rainfall along and near the Gulf Coast and traveled inland. In Georgia, the statewide coverage of abnormally dry conditions decreased by nearly 5 percent in southeastern parts of the state.

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Rainfall from Hurricane Sally erased any remaining abnormally dry conditions in Florida. The entire state of Florida does not show any drought classification on the USDM scale for the first time since mid-July 2020.

 (The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Continuing the trend over the last couple months, North Carolina remained free of any abnormally dry or drought conditions on the USDM scale.

 

(The U.S. Drought Monitor is jointly produced by the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Map courtesy of NDMC-UNL.)

Over the next week, the greatest precipitation accumulations in the contiguous United States are projected in the Pacific Northwest, as well as areas of the Southeast and Texas as Tropical Storm Beta travels inland. Meanwhile, little to no rainfall is projected throughout large portions of the Southwest, Great Plains, Midwest, and Northeast. To check out the forecast near you, try the NOAA Quantitative Precipitation Forecast map.

The website links below include the current drought monitors and other current drought conditions information.

 

RECOMMENDED LINKS

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND DATA

Drought Conditions in Texas and the United States

Reservoir Levels in Texas

Streamflow Conditions in Texas

Groundwater Levels in Texas

Drought Restrictions in Texas

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TagsCurrent Drought Conditions, Drought Index, Drought Maps, Drought Monitor, Drought Response, Drought Restrictions, Groundwater, Historical Data, reservoir levels, streamflow,

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